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Archive for October, 2016

31 October
Comments Off on Not Sure Where to Find Decent Yields? Try Real Estate

Not Sure Where to Find Decent Yields? Try Real Estate

Real estate funds have built towering annual returns of 14% over the past three years, so odds are good that the next three wont be as strong. But if youre an income-focused investor frustrated by low interest rates, real estate funds can still deliver decent dividends.

Most real estate funds invest primarily in real estate investment trusts, which buy, manage, and sell commercial properties such as office buildings, shopping malls, and apartments. By law, REITs must pass nearly all their taxable income to shareholders. So despite the run-up in prices lately, REITs still pay juicy yields3.5%, vs. 2% for the Samp;P 500 index of blue-chip stocks. True, REIT income doesnt qualify for the beneficial tax rate (typically 15%) on qualified stock dividends. But REITs offer double the 1.6% yield on 10-year Treasury notes.

30 October
Comments Off on Real estate transactions

Real estate transactions

The following real estate transactions were recorded recently at the Johnston County Courthouse:

Kimberly C. Perdue to William T. Pope, lot in Glen Laurel subdivision, $234,000.

42 East LLC to Terramor Homes Inc., two lots in Wilders Township, $273,000.

Jerry Pounds Construction Inc. to Christopher Baker and Holly Baker, lot in Pecan Grove subdivision, $330,000.

Marshall J. Murphy and Courtney E. Murphy to Melvin Claude Maracle and Christina Rose Maracle, lot in Twisted Oaks subdivision, $217,000.

Elizabeth K. Slocum and Charles J. Slocum to Matthew Alan Johnson and Amanda Johnson, lot in Riverwood Athletic Club’s Wolf Laurel subdivision, $262,000.

Jennifer Hess to Andrew Earp and Kaitlin Aeschleman, lot in Trent Woods subdivision, $200,000.

Allan Canady Builder Inc. to Jeffrey S. Blessinger and Pamela K. Blessinger, lot in Pecan Grove subdivision, $285,000.

Carolyn Raper to George E. Adams Jr. and Patricia A. Adams, tracts in O’Neals Township, $207,000.

Helen M. Tackitt and Matthew Tackitt to Paul Richards and Antoinette Richards, lot in Southwick Farm subdivision, $210,000.

Samp;D Builders Inc. to Philip J. Broughton, lot in South Quarter subdivision at Flowers Plantation, $499,000.

Diplomat Property Manager LLC to Chad Lee Noles, lot in Stoney Brook subdivision, $225,500.

Royal Oaks Building Group LLC to Joshua Mitchell and Veronica Mitchell, lot in Chandler Ridge subdivision, $215,500.

Carroll Construction Homes Inc. to Jason Christopher Jordan and Blair Alexandria Jordan, lot in Kyndal subdivision, $256,000.

Gray Wolf Development LLC to SDH Raleigh LLC, lot in Knolls at the Neuse subdivision, $270,000.

Golden Properties and Development Inc. to David R. Duke and Dawn Duke, lot in Kyndal subdivision, $257,500.

James T. Merendino to Randall D. Watts and Deborah C. Watts, lot in Trent Woods subdivision, $229,000.

Roger C. Smith Jr. and Doris J. Smith to David J. Williams and Darlene Shields Williams, lot in Austin’s Pond subdivision, Clayton Township, $229,000.

Darryl D. Evans Inc. to Christy C. Ring and Gary W. Ring, lot in Heritage subdivision, $260,000.

Lee Anderson Williams, et al, to Christopher D. Manley and Blake H. Manley, five acres on NC 50 south of Garner, $435,000.

Halbert L. Barbee and Donna E. Barbee to Kenneth Sweat and Suzanne Sweat, lot in Riverwood Athletic Club subdivision, $236,000.

Jeffrey Gower and Nancy Gower to WGH North Carolina LLC, lot in Spring Creek Estates subdivision, $204,000.

Nicholas Riddick and Natallia Riddick to WGH North Carolina LLC, lot in Tymber Creek subdivision, $206,000.

Royal Oaks Building Group LLC to Christopher Lamont Kelly and Keisha Nicole Gray, lot in Chandler Ridge subdivision, $295,500.

Wynn Construction Inc. to Bryan Andrew Meer and Jodie Lynn Meer, lot in Glen Laurel East subdivision, $335,500.

Royal Oaks Building Group LLC to Samantha L. Schooley and Matthew S. Schooley, lot in Chandler Ridge subdivision, $250,000.

Capitol City Homes LLC to Margarita C. Rodriguez and Gabriel Jason Rodriguez, lot in Amary Meadows subdivision, $200,000.

Wood Construction Co. Inc. to Johnny F. Biggs Jr. and Johnelle C. Biggs, lot in Woodcroft subdivision, $275,000.

Miland Inc. to Christopher H. Wyckoff and Marlen Simon, lot in Peachtree subdivision at Flowers Plantation, $257,000.

Louis J. Schultz II and Suzanne Schultz to Charles Damron and Claudia Damron, lot in Riverwood Athletic Club’s Alpine Valley subdivision, $282,000.

Preps Inc. to Adams C-Store of PPL LLC, tract in Boon Hill Township, $410,000.

Golden Properties and Development Inc. to Richard A. Macri and Catherine M. Macri, lot in Maplewood Run subdivision, $247,000.

Kristi Ann Coats and Nicole L. Coats to Jared N. Thornburg and Kristin K. Thornburg, lot in Pleasant Woods subdivision, $220,000.

Daniel Raymond Pedersen and Jenine Maebelle Pedersen to Ian Veling and Laura Veling, lot in The Woodlands at Adams Point subdivision, $300,000.

Weaver Homes Inc. to John S. Gillilan and Cheryl S. Gillilan, lot in Price Pond subdivision, $250,000.

Dennis A. Bernardi and Jeffie S. Bernardi to Joseph Lynn Thompson and Sherry Lyn Thompson, lot in Laurel Ridge subdivision, $435,000.

James Calvin Blydenburgh Jr. to Kristi A. Coats and Nicole L. Coats, lot in McLemore Estates subdivision, $450,500.

Dominique Kurtz Wiest to William Frank Vaughan, lot in Cliffwood subdivision, $205,000.

David R. Gardner and Sonya J. Gardner to Barry W. Thornhill and Tina H. Thornhill, lot in Broadmoor West subdivision, $388,500.

Zachary S. Hall and Alyson Hall to FREO North Carolina LLC, lot in Twisted Oaks subdivision, $219,000.

Charles Daniel Chrismon and Brandy Pittman Chrismon to Sonya Joy Gardner and David Ricky Gardner, two lots in Benson, $220,000.

Grey Heron Construction Inc. to Gwendolyn F. Norville, lot in Pineville East Cottages, $256,000.

Darryl D. Evans Inc. to Allen M. Baird and Leona L. Baird, lot in Hannah’s Creek subdivision, $365,000.

HLMVRT LLC to Royal Oaks Building Group LLC, lot in Bristol at Cobblestone subdivision, $270,000.

Charlie D. Rhodes, et al, to Gray Wolf Development LLC, 41.188 acres, $550,000.

Golden Properties and Development Inc. to Jennifer L. Flood and Phillip Flood, lot in Saylor’s Ridge subdivision, $252,000.

Keith W. Bonini and Haley Bonini to Tonia Holloway McCormick and Kenneth V. McCormick Jr., lot in Plantation Point subdivision, $245,000.

Eastwood Homes of Raleigh LLC to Brian McCoy and Dawn M. McCoy, lot in Flowers Crest subdivision at Flowers Plantation, $272,500.

Wynn Construction Inc. to WGH North Carolina LLC, lot in Verndell at Adams Point subdivision, $255,000.

Wynn Construction Inc. to WGH North Carolina LLC, lot in Verndell at Adams Point subdivision, $255,000.

Wynn Construction,Inc. to WGH North Carolina LLC, lot in Verndell at Adams Point subdivision, $255,000.

Jason V. Underwood and Kathleen A. Underwood to Benjamin T. Leach and Bonney K. Leach, lot in The Highlands at Adams Point subdivision, $250,000.

Comfort Homes Inc. to Wade Jurney Homes Inc., lot in Sierra Heights subdivision, $245,000.

On Top Building Co. LLC to Herbert Jerome Blue and Lachandra Blue, one tract in Clayton, $210,000.

Caviness amp; Cates Building and Development Co. to Brittany N. Compher and Robert B. Compher, lot in Riverwood Athletic Club’s Alpine Valley subdivision, $302,500.

Randy Glenn Godwin and Kay C. Godwin to Mark A. Smith and Michele E. Smith, two acres in Clayton Township, $204,500.

Royal Oaks Building Group LLC to Gloria E. Gould and Tyrone Gould Jr., lot in Chandler Ridge subdivision, $270,000.

Ted D. Brown and Veronika C. Brown to Santiago A. Motta and Carmen R. Franco-Motta, lot in The Knolls at the Neuse subdivision, $252,500.

Richard M. Roe and Janet R. Roe to Raymond W. Cutting and Kathie L McCutcheon, 27.72 acres, $430,000.

Carroll Construction Homes Inc. to Michael J. Mortier and Pamela S. Mortier, lot in Kyndal subdivision, $251,000.

Capitol City Homes LLC to WGH North Carolina LLC, lot in Amary Meadows subdivision, $200,000.

Wynn Construction Inc. to Kari Gellenbeck, lot in Verndell at Adams Point subdivision, $240,000.

Mungo Homes of North Carolina Inc. to Kathleen Hanaburgh and Debra White, lot in Cleveland Bluffs subdivision, Cleveland Township, $280,000.

Mungo Homes of North Carolina Inc. to Sylvia G. Williams and Douglas Bennett Clendenin, lot in Broadmoor West subdivision, $350,000.

Brentt S. Walker and Lindsey M. Walker to Steven K. Burnett and Lisa H. Burnett, lot in Bennett Place subdivision, $200,000.

Steve M. Koleno and Jeane C. Koleno to Kimberley Dawn Metts and Paul Francis Vasalofsky, lot in Hunting Ridge subdivision, Cleveland Township, $242,000.

Marian Wallace Romero to Frank B. Sweigart and Susan M. Birk-Sweigart, lot in Broadmoor subdivision, $221,500.

Carroll Construction Homes Inc. to Matthew Griffin and Amanda Griffin, lot in Island Creek subdivision, $277,000.

Caliber Development Inc. to Edwin Devaris Holland and Tara Leah Holland, lot in Windsor Green Estates subdivision, $201,000.

Holly E. Macho and Dennis M. Macho to FREO North Carolina LLC, lot in Riverwood Athletic Club subdivision, $201,000.

Carroll Construction Homes Inc. to Walter L. Smith and Catrina M. Smith, lot in Kyndal subdivision, $255,500.

Wynn Construction Inc. to Marquette Leach and Marinus Leach, lot in Stone Ridge subdivision, $251,000.

Robert Allen Tucci and Kristina Maria Tucci to WGH North Carolina LLC, lot in Lee Forest subdivision, $220,000.

Jason Moran Bates and Holly Moran Bates to Jaime Sanchez and Anamaria Sanchez, lot in Terrace Ridge subdivision, $205,000.

Joseph F. Kenny and Joanne L. Kenny to James Muskelly III and Michelle Muskelly, lot in Twisted Oaks subdivision, $215,000.

Mark George Crews and Daranda Keen Crews to Jon Lietz and Standish Lietz, lot in The Reserve at Tuscany subdivision, $245,000.

Carroll Construction Homes Inc. to Gregory Howard Phillpotts and Carolyn A. Phillpotts, lot in Jordan Ridge subdivision, $239,000.

Cates Building Inc. to Carmin Pollard Ipock and Joseph F. Ipock, lot in The Pines at Winston Pointe subdivision, $300,000.

Dane Wiggins and Natalie Wiggins to Christopher Hyman and Amy Hyman, lot in Laurel Ridge subdivision, $232,000.

25 October
Comments Off on Inland industrial real estate demand strong

Inland industrial real estate demand strong

Inland Southern California is riding the crest of a wave of e-commerce.

That is the assessment in recent reports on industrial real estate in Southern California.

These findings reinforce what real estate services firms have been saying for several quarters about market strength.

Here are the highlights.

Cushman amp; Wakefield

With year-to-date leasing activity totaling 30.6 million square feet, the Inland Empire is one of the hottest markets in the nation, according to the company’s third quarter Los Angeles Basin Industrial Market report.

Other parts of Southern California are relying on infill development – repurposing of vacant or underutilized space in urban areas – to meet e-commerce’s demand for warehouse space that allows for one-day delivery.

Overall vacancy rates are higher here: 4.7 percent for the Inland area compared with 1.3 percent for greater Los Angeles and 2.2 percent for Orange County.

The Inland Empire West submarket was tighter, with 2.7 percent overall vacancy compared with 7.9 percent for Inland Empire East and 4.7 for Inland Empire South.

The West submarket had 9,424,543 square feet of industrial space under construction, compared with 8,313,060 square feet for the East and 657,650 square feet for the South.

The East submarket had the lowest average monthly rent for warehouse and distribution, 42 cents per square foot, compared with 54 cents for the West and 53 cents for the South.

The average for the total Los Angeles basin was 68 cents.

Lee amp; Associates

Bulk distribution space is among the strongest sectors, according to Lee amp; Associates’ third quarter Industrial Market Report for the region.

There were 7.3 million square feet under construction, 78 percent of it in projects that were 200,000 square feet or larger. Construction of buildings less than 100,000 square feet is picking up.

The firm, which has offices in Riverside and Murrieta, looked at three submarkets.

East Valley: Of 189,841,733 total square feet for manufacuring and distribution, 12,002,701 square feet were vacant, a 6.32 percent rate.

Corona/Norco: Of 31,089,058 total square feet, 985,283 square feet were vacant, a 3.17 percent rate.

Southwest Riverside County: Of 38,248,443 total square feet, 1,026,023 square feet were vacant, a 2.68 percent rate.

CBRE

The sheer volume of cargo comes to the Inland area from the twin ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles makes it “an epicenter of growth” and a leading indicator for all of Southern California real estate, according to an August report called “The Ripple Effect of the Inland Empire Industrial Market on Southern California.”

The demand for e-commerce has kept retail real estate from fully returning to pre-recession levels, according to the report, with luxury and discount stores doing better than mid-priced stores.

Contact the writer: fbuck@scng.com or 951-368-9551.

22 October
Comments Off on Getting serious about cereal bars

Getting serious about cereal bars

By Dan Scholes

The appetite for handy, individually wrapped snack bars has been on the rise for years. They are a standard lunch-box filler, a convenient grab-and-go solution for the fast-paced commuting lifestyle, and an easy way to “fill the void” day or night.

Many of these tasty convenient bars have carved out a niche in the breakfast category, knowing full well that sitting down for a bowl of cereal or a boiled egg is a timely luxury that many can’t afford to cram into their weekday morning routine. The tearing open of a cereal bar has also become a commonplace ritual to subdue the mid-morning symphony of hunger pains heard across many office floors and classrooms.

Over time the category has proliferated, and now includes a wide range of flavour options and nutritional variations. Some are targeted to the little ones, while others are aimed at the ultra health conscious. We recently set out to explore a small part of the serious world of cereal bars to see if they are all equally serious contenders.

Serious minded

We recruited 50 females between the ages of 25 and 54 from the Greater Toronto Area who are regular consumers of cereal bars. They tasted and evaluated four brands of strawberry flavoured cereal bars, including two national brands and two private-label brands. They were asked a series of detailed hedonic and “just about right” questions regarding the appearance, flavour, and textural profiles of the cereal bars.

Seriously great

One of the four cereal bars in our brand array had some seriously great product credentials. It boasted the top scores on all key measures including overall liking and overall flavour. A whopping 46 per cent said they would definitely buy this bar, which far exceeds our benchmark for definite purchase intent in this category.

Overall this bar did not have the fruitiest or sweetest flavour, but it was described as chewy, satisfying, delicious, healthy, and having a uniquely nuttier flavour than the other bars. Interestingly, in addition to coveting the best product profile, the product was also perceived to be significantly healthier than the other three cereal bars. However, the perception of healthy is not always reality. Like a wolf in sheep’s clothing, this bar had an appearance of healthiness which was not actually mirrored in the nutritional declaration. It had more calories and fat content than the other three bars, although on the upside, it was pumped with fibre delivery and at par with the others on sugar content.

Are you serious?

The next two runners-up in our cereal bar contest had a respectable showing overall. They may not have reached the same heights as the winning brand, but they achieved many of our performance hurdles. They would both benefit from a bit of fine-tuning, but overall these bars were certainly shelf-worthy.

Unfortunately one brand in our foursome did not perform well, falling well below the acceptable norms for overall liking and purchase intent. The strawberry filling did not have a desirable flavour – it was too sweet, not fruity enough, and was followed by a disagreeable aftertaste. The colour of the filling was also too dark and seemingly artificial. The filling was not the only problem – the outer shell was too dry, too hard, and even came across to some as stale. Moving the dial on overall liking would require some serious reformulation for this underachiever.

Dead serious

Although our top-performing cereal bar did not have the most nutritious credentials in the pack, it did boast twice as much fibre delivery than the others – which by the way was stated as the most important nutritional benefit among our cereal bar consumers. We do not think this is a coincidence, and it leads us to speculate that this brand mastermind is truly in it to win it.

But like most competitive fields, there can only be one true winner followed by a few serious contenders that are close on their heels, continuously striving to improve the overall pace of the race and narrow the gap with the front-runner. But if you’re not a serious contender, racing miles off the pace, satisfied to anchor the back of the pack indefinitely, there will come a day that you will be proverbially “eaten for breakfast”…and that’s no joke.

For questions about this research, or how you can leverage consumer taste buds in your business, contact Dan Scholes at [emailprotected] or (905) 456-0783.

This article appeared in the print issue:October 2016 edition, Sensory Trends section

20 October
Comments Off on Tucson real estate: Scottsdale investors buy north-side complex

Tucson real estate: Scottsdale investors buy north-side complex

  • Evergreen-Steam Pump LLC sold two pads at Steam Pump Village in Oro Valley. Steampump Native bought 58,072 square feet of land at 11107 N. Oracle Road for $825,000 and Steampump Freddy’s LLC bought 67,751 square feet of land at 11143 N. Oracle Road for $650,000. Brenna Lacey and Dave Hammack of Volk Co. represented the seller.
  • TVP Real Estate LLC bought a 7,238-square-foot building at 7507 Tanque Verde Road from Karen and Herbert Kirsch for $675,000. Bruce A. Suppes and David A. Volk, with CBRE, represented the buyer, and Robert J. Nolan, of Oxford Realty Advisors, represented the seller.
  • Beall’s Outlet leased 21,580 square feet in the Circle Plaza Shopping Center, on the southeast corner of Broadway and Kolb Road. It is scheduled to open for business in the spring. Andy Seleznov and Melissa Lal represented the landlord, Larsen Baker, while Tim Westfall, of Newmark Grubb Knight Frank, represented the tenant.
  • Sunstreet Mortgage LLC leased 9,329 square feet at 1725 E. Skyline Drive in the Skyline Esplanade Professional Office Centre. The owner of the building, United Insurance Co. of America, was represented by Michael Sarabia and James Hardman of DESCO Southwest. The tenant was represented by Doug Marsh, of Oxford Realty Advisors Inc.
  • Parisi Speed School leased 8,246 square feet at Marana Marketplace on the southeast corner of Orange Grove and Thornydale roads. Andy Seleznov and Melissa Lal represented the landlord, Larsen Baker, and Brian Ledbetter, of Zell Commercial Real Estate, represented the tenant.
  • Wireless PCS AZ LLC leased 2,613 square feet at 2620 E. 22nd St. from 2626 Investments LLC. Jeramy Price of Volk Co. represented the landlord.
19 October
Comments Off on Afghan refugee repatriation threaten to tear marriages apart

Afghan refugee repatriation threaten to tear marriages apart

PESHAWAR: The ongoing repatriation and deportation of Afghan refugees from Pakistan has not only compelled them to sell valuable property and businesses for a song but also abandon spouses with Pakistani nationality.

Pakistani women married to Afghan men are in a fix as they dont want to leave their families in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province and the tribal areas along Pakistan-Afghanistan border by moving to a new country.

I have my family here and we have never visited Afghanistan, BanoGul, 40, told News Lens. There is nothing in Afghanistan for my husband to do. How would we live if we go there?

Gul belongs to a poor family in Koladher, Charssadda. She is married to an Afghan whose family got settled in the Charssadda district 35 years ago when the first wave of refugees entered Pakistan in the early 1980s, in the wake of Russian invasion of Afghanistan. She has three sons and two daughters.

I never thought there would be time when my husband would want to leave this home for Afghanistan, said Gul. Their children study in a local government school and her husband runs a shoe shop in the Charssadda bazaar. We have a very happy life here.

According to United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR), with over 1.5 million registered Afghan refugees, Pakistan hosts 10.5 percent of the global refugee population which also constitutes the worlds largest protracted refugee situation under UNHCRs mandate.

Originating mainly from the provinces in the eastern border areas, the majority of registered Afghan refugees in Pakistan are ethnic Pashtun (85 percent) with smaller numbers from other ethnic groups, including Turkmen, Uzbek, Tajik and Hazara, says UNHCR.

According to the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Home and Tribal Affairs Department, 1 million Afghan refugees live without registration in KP and FATA. An official at the department, who wished to stay anonymous because he was not authorised to speak to media, said the long stay of Afghan refugees generally in Pakistan and particularly in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa had changed their refugee status into family relations with locals.

The ratio of inter-marriages between Pakistanis and Afghans is high, especially between the Pashtuns who live on both sides of the border, said the official.

He said the majority of cases of intermarriages were reported in Mardan, Charssada, Peshawar, Nowshera, Swabi, Upper and Lower Dir in the Khyber Pakhtunkwa province and some parts of the Federally Administered Tribal Area (Fata).

In the past, federal governments have extended the legal residency deadline for registered Afghans multiple times. However in June 2016, the federal government extended the stay for registered Afghan refugees for six months till the end of 2016 with no intent of further extension.

The official at the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Home and Tribal Affairs Department said that as per the Pakistan Citizenship Act 1951, Afghan refugees were not given Pakistani nationality, even those born in Pakistan. He said Pakistani women married to Afghan nationals could go with their husbands to Afghanistan through a proper visa procedure. If their husbands want to live in Pakistan, they could come here through visa and live according to the country rules for foreigners.

Nazakat Bibi, who is married to an Afghan Raza Haroon Usami, said her husband was born in Pakistan after his family sought refuge in Peshawar 30 years ago. She said her husband and his family members owned business and property here.

Bibi, who has three sons, said she didnt want to leave Pakistan. When I resisted the idea of leaving for Afghanistan, my husband said he would go with my sons and I could live here alone if I wish to. I cannot live without my children so I have to leave for Afghanistan.

Earlier this month, the Federal interior Minister Chaudhary Nisar said the children of an Afghan man married to a Pakistani woman would be treated as Afghan nationals, not Pakistanis.

Amina Rafiq, a legal expert and senior lawyer in Peshawar High Court, said that according to the UNHCR Solutions Strategy for Afghan Refugees (SSAR) formulated by Afghan Management and Repatriation Strategy (AMRS) Cell of Home Department, Afghan refugees married to Pakistani women would not be given Pakistani nationality. She said that there were many cases where Pakistani women didnt want to go to Afghanistan with their Afghan spouses.

This article originally appeared in News Lens and has been reproduced with permission

17 October
Comments Off on October 7, 2016 in Opinion: Food diary keeps dieters honest

October 7, 2016 in Opinion: Food diary keeps dieters honest

Daily habits turn into a weekly routine, which can become your lifestyle. So what if the answer to your success or your goal physique included a daily diary? A study from the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found that people who were committed to the food diary for six days a week lost twice as much weight and were successful in keeping it off.

Students come to college thinking any form of consumption wont affect that high metabolic body and there won’t be consequences, but oh are we wrong. I was blind from my intake and gained more than the “Freshman-Fifteen.” Now, I want to try to change the outcomes and teach myself how to rethink health with the help of a food diary.

My Food Diary:

I used to think I knew what I was eating I thought I chose the right items and ate healthy food. After a week of notes and a food diary, I am now cautious about what I eat and think twice before choosing an option and writing it down.

Each morning, I ate some form of fruit, a granola bar and then energized with a cup or two of coffee. I am not much of a morning eater, so the coffee filled me up until lunch.

I have also transitioned into a “to-go” eater because I have a few jobs and I am balancing a new school schedule.

This developed skill has only led me to spill, rush my meal and then grow hungry in a couple hours. I fuel my hunger later with a “snack” of a Starbucks Double Shot drink with protein to get me through until dinner.

Generally for dinner I eat chicken or turkey and pair it with some veggies or a salad.

After a long day of school and work, I now realize I overeat when I get home, and I snack while I am in the process of making a meal. Sometimes I even get lazy and give in to take out or a quick sub. Either option results in being so full and regretful, I just want to sleep.

My short bursts of healthiness have led to long periods of hunger, loss of energy during the day and overindulgence at night. I have learned a lot from my daily intake, the times that work best, what I need to replace and what works best for my body.

If you want to create your own food diary, here are some helpful hints for your journey:

  1. Write down what you consumed immediately after so it is still fresh in the mind. Victor Stevens, PhD, senior investigator at the Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research in Portland, Ore., said, “You’re accountable to yourself when you’re writing it down, and you’re accountable to other people who are looking at your food record.”
  2. If you’re on the go, plan your meals, or prepare something ahead of time. Never skip a meal because of your lack of planning or being too busy. This leads to over-indulging at a meal or over snacking with whatever is around. “You’ll have more control over what you consume, and you know what that food contains, and how much of it you’re eating,” Stevens said.
  3. Think twice about if you’re really “hungry,” and drink lots of water during the day. Carole Anne Tomlinson, registered nurse with experience in nutrition, dehydration and health problems said, “When you do not drink enough water, your body receives mixed signals on hunger. Dehydration causes you to believe you need to eat when you really need liquid intake.”
15 October
Comments Off on IT’S ALL IN ORLEANS: An election candidate everyone agrees on

IT’S ALL IN ORLEANS: An election candidate everyone agrees on

By Noelle Pina

Coastal Living Magazine has just named Orleans as a finalist in the 2017 Happiest Seaside Town contest, a candidate everyone agrees on!#xa0;

This is an #x201c;easy election decision for those who love Orleans,#x201d; with voting open to all with access to computer, tablet, or mobile phone. Votes can be cast every 15 minutes at www.coastalliving.com/travel/happiest-seaside-town, every day, now through October 17, so let our voices be heard.#xa0;

Vote early and often!#xa0;

Competition is serious, with nominees from around the USA, but Orleans is the clear and obvious pick, a reflection of the unique quality of life that evokes smiles of contentment from all who know Orleans, truly the happiest seaside town.#xa0;

Here#x2019;s how Coastal Living describes us:#xa0;

A historic gem with tawny beaches that grace both the Bay and Atlantic sides of#xa0;Cape Cod, this charming New England town of 5890 is both summer escape and#xa0;year-round enclave.#xa0;

Yes, indeed, but there#x2019;s so much more, exemplified in the town-wide ClamBQ last weekend, the spectacular Paul Fulcher Memorial Bonfire on Nauset Beach two weeks ago attended by thousands, plus the array of happy events highlighted in the photo collage, classic instances of what Coastal Living editors call our #x201c;coastal vibe.#x201d;

Here#x2019;s how Orleans and the other finalists were picked:#xa0;

To choose the 2017 finalists, we began by reviewing destinations that have been covered by the magazine and nominated via social media. From there, we looked at rank on the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index, percentage of clear and sunny days, healthiness of beaches, commute times, walkability, crime ratings, standard of living and financial well-being of the locals, geographic diversity, and our editors assessment of each towns coastal vibe.#x201d;#xa0;

Again, vote early and often for Orleans! When you visit the Coastal Living website to cast your votes, you#x2019;ll see that the other nine finalists, listed in alphabetical order, have attractions too, but none can say with pride that #x201c;It#x2019;s All In Orleans!#x201d;#xa0;

Noelle Pina is Executive Director of the Orleans Chamber of Commerce.#xa0; The Chamber works closely with businesses, the Town, and other community organizations to promote the Orleans #x201c;coastal vibe.#x201d;#xa0; The Orleans Community Partnership, Inc. (OCP) and the Orleans Cultural District are honored to collaborate with the Chamber in #x201c;public-private-partnership#x201d; (#x201c;P3#x201d;) to celebrate Orleans.#xa0; For more on the Chamber, visit#xa0;www.orleancapecod.org; for more on OCP and the Orleans Cultural District, visit the strikingly revampedwww.itsallinorleans.org.

#xa0;

#xa0;

#xa0;

11 October
Comments Off on Police Incident Report for Sept. 14 to 27

Police Incident Report for Sept. 14 to 27

The North Haven Courier publishes a Police Incident Report to inform residents of incidents, criminal activities, and police responses occurring in town. As those charged are presumed innocent until proven guilty, the report does not include names. It may be edited for space and content.

Wednesday, Sept. 14

No arrests were made.

#x2022; A 33 year-old man of Angel Place was issued a misdemeanor summons at 10:29 am for operating a motor vehicle while under license or registration suspension and operating an unregistered motor vehicle.

#x2022; A 33 year-old Hamden woman was issued a misdemeanor summons at 4:31 pm for operating a motor vehicle while under license or registration suspension and using a hand-held cell phone while driving.

Thursday, Sept. 15

#x2022; A 34 year-old man of Country Way was arrested at 8:50 pm and charged with driving while under the influence of alcohol or drugs and failure to have headlights lit.

#x2022; A 63 year-old New Haven man was issued a misdemeanor summons at 12:30 pm for operating a motor vehicle while under license or registration suspension.

#x2022; A 28 year-old New Haven man was issued a misdemeanor summons at 6:40 pm for operating a motor vehicle while under license or registration suspension and failure to display plate.

Friday, Sept. 16

#x2022; A 54 year-old Branford man was arrested at 3:34 am and charged with burglary in the third degree and larceny in the sixth degree.

Saturday, Sept. 17

#x2022; A 37 year-old Rockfall man was arrested at 10:25 am and charged with driving while under the influence of alcohol or drugs, possession of drug paraphernalia, operating a motor vehicle while under license or registration suspension, failure to bring a motor vehicle to a full stop, failure to maintain the proper lane of a multiple lane highway, and failure to obey a control signal.

#x2022; A 22 year-old New Haven woman was issued a misdemeanor summons at 6:07 pm for misuse of plate, operating an unregistered motor vehicle, and operating a motor vehicle without a driver#x2019;s license.

Sunday, Sept. 18

No arrests were made.

#x2022; A 28 year-old man of unrecorded address was issued a misdemeanor summons at 1:56 am for operating a motor vehicle without insurance, operating an unregistered motor vehicle, and operating a motor vehicle without a driver#x2019;s license.

Monday, Sept. 19

#x2022; A 25 year-old East Haven man was arrested at 1 am and charged with violation of a restraining order.

Tuesday, Sept. 20

#x2022; A 48 year-old man of Moulthrop Street was arrested at 6:30 pm and charged with larceny in the second degree.

Wednesday, Sept. 21

#x2022; A 52 year-old Wallingford man was arrested at 8 pm and charged with disorderly conduct, assault in the third degree, and possession of a controlled substance.

#x2022; A 59 year-old woman of Phillip Place was arrested at 9 pm and charged with disorderly conduct and assault in the third degree.

#x2022; A 42 year-old Meriden man was issued a misdemeanor summons at 2:38 am for operating a motor vehicle without insurance, misuse of plate, and operating an unregistered motor vehicle.

#x2022; A 49 year-old New Haven woman was issued a misdemeanor summons at 1:02 pm for operating a motor vehicle without insurance.

Thursday, Sept. 22

#x2022; A 55 year-old New Haven man was arrested at 11:35 am and charged with reckless driving and failure to bring a motor vehicle to a full stop.

#x2022; A 44 year-old New Haven man was arrested at 8:20 pm and charged with sexual assault in the fourth degree and risk of injury to a minor.

#x2022; A 40 year-old man of Milo Drive was issued a misdemeanor summons at 7:07 am for operating a motor vehicle without insurance and operating an unregistered motor vehicle.

Friday, Sept. 23

No arrests were made.

#x2022; A 49 year-old man of Pool Road was issued a misdemeanor summons at 7:02 pm for operating a motor vehicle with under license or registration suspension, operating an unregistered motor vehicle, and speeding.

Saturday, Sept. 24

No arrests were made.

#x2022; A 52 year-old man of State Street was issued a misdemeanor summons for operating a motor vehicle while under license or registration suspension and failure to drive a reasonable distance apart.

Sunday, Sept. 25

#x2022; A 46 year-old man of Overbrook Road was arrested at 2 pm and charged with disorderly conduct.

#x2022; A 61 year-old Hamden man was issued a misdemeanor summons at 8:16 pm for operating a motor vehicle without insurance, operating an unregistered motor vehicle, and failure to grant right of way at an intersection.

Monday, Sept. 26

#x2022; A 23 year-old Wallingford man was arrested at 2:50 pm on a warrant charging him with failure to appear for a motor vehicle summons.

#x2022; A 50 year-old man of Valley Brook Lane was arrested at 10:31 pm and charged with disorderly conduct.

#x2022; A 43 year-old Meriden man was issued a misdemeanor summons at 7:08 am for operating a motor vehicle without insurance, operating an unregistered motor vehicle, and improper license classification for vehicle driven.

#x2022; A 38 year-old New Haven man was issued a misdemeanor summons at 2:37 pm for misuse of plate, operating a motor vehicle without insurance, operating an unregistered motor vehicle, and operating a motor vehicle without a driver#x2019;s license.

Tuesday, Sept. 27

#x2022; A 54 New Haven man was arrested at 7:30 am on a warrant charging with failure to appear for a motor vehicle summons and conspiracy.

#x2022; A 46 year-old Ansonia man was arrested at 4:27 pm and charged with violation of a protective order.

#xa0;

Senior correspondent Jason J. Marchi compiles the Police Incident Report.

11 October
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Young marriages, torn apart by stress, faster than ever

Porn-watching has replaced sex. Emotional intimacy has been replaced by video games or other distractions.